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removing glue/epoxy from aluminum


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#1 Kaldsk

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Posted March 27 2008 - 8:50 AM

I just picked up a small aluminum boat for feshwater fishing and the previous owner had glued/expoxied carpet in it (its a 12' jon boat btw). he had removed it from the floor but not the seats, there is still residue from it all over and I would like to remove it from the seats as well, its that ugly green astro turf crap. Whats the best way to remove the glue/epoxy residue? I dont need it to be gleaming but I would like to get rid of the ugly brown spots

dont know if it makes too much of a difference but I have no idea what type of glue/epoxy it is.

thanks



#2 Wayne Tj

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Posted March 27 2008 - 9:32 AM

If the glue is silicone, use WD40 and a putty knife. You may want to buy a gallon of the stuff at Homies, etc.
If the former owner used epoxy, the only thing that I can think of is Acetone - but I'm not sure if it will soften it when cured.
BTW, if he/she did use epoxy, that was not smart.


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#3 Kaldsk

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Posted March 27 2008 - 9:52 AM

thanks wayne,

I dont think its silicone, its brown very hard and crusty.



#4 Wayne Tj

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Posted March 27 2008 - 9:59 AM

If the acetone does not work, I would next try a paint remover. That stuff usually softens anything.
You may also want to get a few wire wheels that you can use with your drill. If may actually remove the stuff without having to use chemicals.
And if all else fails, get on the phone with 3M's customer service - they have to have something that will work


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#5 Kaldsk

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Posted March 27 2008 - 10:18 AM

thanks, I'll try the acetone

im not too concerned with it, I think half the appeal of a jon is its uglyness especially when theyre beat up, gives them a bit of character
but these brown crusty areas annoy the hell out of me, especially on the benches, thats my main concern



#6 george6308

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Posted March 27 2008 - 10:18 AM

Try a heat gun and a putty knife and try to scrape it off.



#7 Mr T

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Posted March 29 2008 - 12:26 PM

Try a heat gun and a putty knife and try to scrape it off.


Ditto the heat and scraper trick for epoxy; it's the best way to get it off there. Acetone is no fun to be around for removal of anything, sanding creates dust, which is not healthy for ya.


Try hot and cold, chip and scrape. Most Epoxies will come loose with this approach.



#8 martyfishingman

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Posted April 13 2012 - 4:09 PM


My Neighbor has a boat and he ripped out the carpet off the side of his alum boat.  And He has asked me, what removes the glue, but I got thinking What About Some Kinda Of Wall Paper Stripper  ?  It removes glue off the wall that maybe different glue but it is some really great stuff ..  Yes I have worked with this stuff It leaves one heck of a mess but power wash the inside the boat and hope it would do the trick to get the old glue off the sides. Someone will have to E-mail me, In a week or so, I will see if he would be willing to try it . Thanks Guys !  




#9 Dominic Iadicicco

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Posted April 14 2012 - 8:47 AM

Most Glues and epoxy's wont stick to aluminum or magnesium permanently . The bond of non Ferrous alloys is a hard one to achieve. That's why even when you use a sealer on an aluminum part there is usually a fastener used as well to hold it together. Rivets, screws, etc.... Denatured Alcohol or any suggested above should work real easy.


P.S I know people that have repaired small holes in aluminum transoms with an epoxy and it seems to hold but eventually they come loose. Hell I have seen welds and brazes break if they don't penetrate enough.


Dom