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Lasagna Using Homemade Pasta Sheets


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#1 Prefessa

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Posted March 05 2007 - 6:22 PM

Guys:

Anything wrong with using Pasta Sheets right from the Pasta Rolling Machine to make lasagna??? I cant see boiling Pasta that is already soft and pliable.

My Cookbook says to boil like 1-2 minutes....but won't the sauce take care of that???

Anyone try this at home?


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#2 vasurfisher

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Posted March 05 2007 - 7:35 PM

I've done it that way with no problems.


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#3 Drew

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Posted March 05 2007 - 8:36 PM

I would definately boil the sheets for a minute or 2 and then shock them in an ice/water bath, and then dry them off on a tea towel before using. That's what I do, at least. I would think you will end up with a funny texture/starchy taste otherwise. I could be wrong, though.


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#4 Kings over Queens

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Posted March 05 2007 - 11:05 PM

I've never made lasagna from fresh pasta. Try it and report back.


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#5 Drew

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Posted March 06 2007 - 12:10 AM


Quote:








Originally Posted by Kings over Queens


I've never made lasagna from fresh pasta. Try it and report back.





I eat tons of dried pasta, but one application where I would only go with fresh is lasagna. I like a mixture of all purpose flour with semolina, so you can get really thin sheets that still have some chew to them. I bet if you tried using fresh pasta in your next lasagna you would be reluctant to go back to dried.


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#6 the_simple_life

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Posted March 06 2007 - 2:32 AM

fresh pasta is pliable but if you have ever eaten a piece of fresh uncooked pasta you would know that it is not very pleasant at all. The eggs in the dough are still raw, the flour is raw and starchy tasting. In addition, baking it in the oven would only dry it out more, unless you were using a very watery ragu or sauce.I recently did a lasagne al forno for a party, and i cooked the pasta until it was right before al dente and shocked it, then dried it. Worked great, good luck on your lasagne.


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#7 Ravioli

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Posted March 06 2007 - 8:42 AM

I would definitely cook it for a minute or two and then dry it on a kitchen towel. This is coming from 30 years of working with that stuff.


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#8 Gilbey

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Posted March 06 2007 - 10:08 AM

I have done this many times. I do not precook the pasta. I make dough, 3/4 semolina - 1/4 all purpose flour, and I roll it out in big sheets by hand. The cool thing about this is the sheets are continuous so there is no seepage between layers . In my experience you have to be sure your fillings are extra moist though because the pasta will absorb any available moisture as it cooks. So I don't drain the ricotta, and I keep the red sauce a little soupier than normal. It's a lot of work to roll out, but it's cool to be able to say the whole thing is made from scratch.
I have used the no boil Barilla sheets with good results too, but same deal on the moisture content of the fillings .
Alan


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#9 BigLuke

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Posted March 06 2007 - 10:27 AM

I'd listen to Ravioli on this one ^^^^^^^ !!


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#10 jellybear

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Posted March 06 2007 - 3:54 PM

I sometimes use the frozen sheets as a back up when I am in a hurry,and they work just fine but require twice as much sauce to cook as they really soak it up.
They are great for making mannicotti too.


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#11 Prefessa

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Posted March 06 2007 - 6:50 PM

Guys:

Thank you for all the replies. One thing I may add.....There are two types of fresh pasta. The Northern Italian version is made with white flour and egg, Nothing else! The southern italian version is made from semolina, white flour and water,NO EGG.

Egg pasta does not soak up alot of water and is much easier to make aldente. Water pasta, cooks faster, is light and feathery and soaks up sauces like a sponge.

I am making Egg Pasta if that has any influence on the answer.


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#12 Ravioli

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Posted March 06 2007 - 6:57 PM


Quote:








Originally Posted by Ravioli


I would definitely cook it for a minute or two and then dry it on a kitchen towel. This is coming from 30 years of working with that stuff.





What he said.


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#13 Drew

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Posted March 06 2007 - 9:04 PM


Quote:








Originally Posted by Prefessa


Guys:

Thank you for all the replies. One thing I may add.....There are two types of fresh pasta. The Northern Italian version is made with white flour and egg, Nothing else! The southern italian version is made from semolina, white flour and water,NO EGG.

Egg pasta does not soak up alot of water and is much easier to make aldente. Water pasta, cooks faster, is light and feathery and soaks up sauces like a sponge.

I am making Egg Pasta if that has any influence on the answer.





Wouldn't influence my decision. I'd still blanch the pasta. Let me ask you this: what's the down side to briefly boiling the pasta before assembly? Its not like its a difficult or time consuming, or particularly messy step. Here's a suggestion - look up recipes from some name chefs - say Marcella Hazan, Mario Batalli, Lidia Bastianich, or whoever you hold in high regard, and see how they do it. Good luck.


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#14 technologist

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Posted March 06 2007 - 9:27 PM


Quote:








Originally Posted by Gilbey


I have done this many times. I do not precook the pasta. I make dough, 3/4 semolina - 1/4 all purpose flour, and I roll it out in big sheets by hand. The cool thing about this is the sheets are continuous so there is no seepage between layers . In my experience you have to be sure your fillings are extra moist though because the pasta will absorb any available moisture as it cooks. So I don't drain the ricotta, and I keep the red sauce a little soupier than normal. It's a lot of work to roll out, but it's cool to be able to say the whole thing is made from scratch.
I have used the no boil Barilla sheets with good results too, but same deal on the moisture content of the fillings .
Alan




I agree with Gilbey! I always boiled it first and the sheets would fall apart or be difficult to work with. A few years back I started to put it in uncooked and it comes out perfect. Just keep the filling wet!!


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#15 spook

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Posted March 07 2007 - 3:29 PM

I saw Emeril use dry pasta right out of the package. He said there's enough moisture in the sauce to take care of it. The finished product looked great and folks were eating like crazy.
No, I have not tried it.


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