g2h

who doesn't drink (alcohol) anymore?

11,558 posts in this topic

I loved to party, from high school thru college and right into my early 30's. Never drank every day but when I did there were no half measures with me.

Its been 16-17 years since those days though. In the end, quitting was fairly easy for me. Helped by a few things as Ive always seen it. Walked away without a scratch from 2 DWi totals, the second one finally got me thinking that I was really rolling the dice. Luckily, for the DWI's, VERmont roads are rather desolate at 1am and no other vehicles were involved. It took a couple of months to fully realize I could still have fun or be fun to be with.....all without drinking. Also helped me to be from a rural area where I know almost everyone. Once I had said I was quitting then falling off the wagon would have been apparent to everyone and that helped at times to reinforce my determination. In the first 6 months after deciding to quit, I had 3 nights(contrasted with maybe 3-4 nights a week on the town in my earlier years) where I slipped or screwed up, but was back to it the next day and that last one was years and years ago now.

The only times I ever thought of drinking were the 2-3 times in the first couple of years I was out of state visiting relatives and Id drive by a bar and a little voice in my head would say "hey I could in there and have a drink and no one would know". Id always just freeze and shake my head and think "where did that come from" and drive on.

I hang out in bars all the time, have since I quit....just no alcohol. I couldnt even get served in half the bars locally since I know many of the owners well and some have mentioned they would never serve me that first drink "off the wagon".

In the end, no one can get you to quit drinking, they can guide or help but the final step has to be your own. It helped me to initially go to some AA meetings, just to know I wasnt alone in what I was trying....at times there is comfort in numbers I guess. Good2, as others have said, pm if I can be of any help.

 

Now smoking is the one I have to tackle next and that for me will be far harder than drinking. Due to it being a far more physical addiction as well as I think Im also clinging to it mentally since its my last remaining vice.

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g2h, this is where SOL is at it's best. These guys mean what they say. We're from everywhere, we've done everything. Take advantage.

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I don't drink alcohol anymore. However, it's more so because of digestive issues I have, including gall stones (which I'm too 'chicken' to have surgery) and acid reflux. But it wasn't a big deal to me since I only drank on occasion anyway.

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G2H, It takes a lot of courage to ask for help. Sounds like you have gotten some good insight into the problem of alcoholism, which is different for every one of us. I will pray for you in this hard, early time of your battle. I'd like to back up what John W. had to say; Read the Big Book. It is written long ago but it is timeless and millions before you have been nurtured through the early stages of recovery with its assistance. I'd also suggest taking a deep breath and walking into an AA meeting. Just sit in the back and listen. You are guaranteed a good cup of bad coffee and the chance to listen to people who have fought the same fight you are now in.

 

My heart goes out to you, as well as my prayers. I am sitting here today with a cup of coffee at 6:30 am. My hands are steady and my head is clear. It is a miracle. It has been 12 years since my last and initially I was going from one 15 minutes to the next. You seem to be on the right track and you had the heart to ask for help. You are finding it.

 

PM me if you wish. Whatever you do, READ THE BIG BOOK! clapping.gif

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It's 6:37am. and I'd choke someone to death for a teeth-breakin' cold Heineken right now, but my last drink was April 3rd of 96. As much as I love it, I had to let it go. My quality of life was slipping a little. I could feel my liver with my hand, my wife hated me and the last two years I drank handcuffs were a regular accessory to my evening dress. When I was born, the doctor said "Congradulations Mr. & Mrs. Zimmerman, It's an alcoholic." It is my nature to drink, I'm just not willing to pay the price for it anymore.

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Alot of good information here. Take advantage of it and take them up on the phone numbers if you need to talk.

Losing all the friends and co-workers in the past few months is a bad turn, if it's bothering you that much you should seek counseling. Ya don't drink grief away it comes back over and over again.

Alot of people here work in public services, PD, FD, EMS and deal with others in truely sad and heart breaking times. Some to seek help for depression some deal with it on their own. But most have learned to deal. You may need some professional help to get you past the last few months and point you forward. Think about it.

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May 16, 1993 - (I left my brain on the 5-15)

Worked as a CADC (certified Alcohol Drug counselor) for 7 years

Pm me if ya want more info on Tx or meetings.

 

You can do it-"One day at a Time"

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G2H,

You have taken the first step. Admitting you have a problem. I am very sorry to hear about your friends, and I cant imagine what youve been through, but try to remember.... YOUR STILL HERE! You cant do anything to bring them back, and hitting the sauce aint gonna do it either. Get some counseling now, and fix yourself, and your family issues. Nothing is more important than your health and your family.

 

Scott

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Man where to start.

 

I love booze - all booze - I was Very good at drinking but not very good at stopping & going to bed.

 

Booze cost me more than mere money, Friends, jobs & almost my marriage & life itself.

 

Quitting was one of the best things I ever did. Life is SO much easier now, better also, at least for me.

 

I did AA for a year (Great Org filled with folks who actually know what they are talking about ). I stopped going and for a year was OK - then thought I wasn't an alc. Within a few months I was back in the crap, broken bones, broken friendships, broken marriage. I haven't had a drink in 5 years. I am Happy again, my family life is great, no worries about my employment, no worries about all the baggage that comes with booze.

 

One thing - You can not do it in half measures - It's an all or nothing thing

Another thing you can't hang with your friends that drink while they are drinking - at least I couldn't without saying "I'll just have a couple".

 

Best of luck with it. If you stop your life will get better. Your loved ones will thank you for it.

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I grew up with an alcoholic dad. He tried everything to quit but it had a hold on him like nothing else. After several DUI's he got his license back, bought a used Jeep Cheerokee and was ready to make a new start. Three days later he is layed up in the hospital from causing an accident. He was drunk. He hurt the other driver, and he went to jail for a year. My dad had to go through this beofre he finally gave it up. We thak God no one was killed and i have my dad back.

Drinking is a selfish way to go through life. AA has done wonders for my dad and he doesnt go a day without a meeting. If you would like his number I can give it to you. PLEASE PLEASE get ahold of this demon. Admiting you have the problem is the first step. clapping.gif

 

 

AllenC

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g2h, this is where SOL is at it's best. These guys mean what they say. We're from everywhere, we've done everything. Take advantage.

 

thanks for all your pm's. there are some truly GREAT people on this site. i will be using those numbers. thank you again from the bottom of my heart.

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Seven years clean and sober last April 10. Drank and drugged every day for 22 years, pretty much built an identity around it. Booze and drugs were my best friend. Then, they absolutely turned on me, and no matter what I did, I couldn't reverse the process. There's nothing worse than the limbo state where you know you want to quit using, and can't. You have a physical, mental, and spiritual disease that can only be arrested a day at a time; simply putting down the booze in many cases isn't enough, and you really need to treat the underlying causes of why you drink. But first, put down the booze.

 

I was absolutely unable to quit on my own. The handful of times I tried ended in failure, and actually resulted in my making a deeper commitment to the substances - if I couldn't beat them, I was going to be the best f-in' boozer and drug abuser I could be.

 

When I finally couldn't take any more, I got in touch with a friend of mine (I'd known him since I was 15, we'd been running buddies for years) whose life I'd seen transform since he got into AA. He hadn't lost his sense of humor, he was still cool, wasn't cultish - he just didn't drink. Frankly, I was at a conscious crossroads where if I didn't get sober, I was going to make the decision to get involved in very deadly drugs. I got sober.

 

I highly recommend AA - a group of drunks who have been through everything you've been through (and more) when they were drinking, and who have been through everything you'll possibly face when sober. They're the same people you got f-ed up with, except now they don't drink. I still occasionally want a drink or a drug, but I don't need them anymore, and that's a huge change.

 

Good luck - make it through today without a drink, and you've taken an enormous step. PM me if you need to...

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no matter how you go about stopping none of them will work unless

you dedicate yourself to it. if you're not serious it won't matter.

i woke up after my 28th birthday with the worst hangover i ever had

and just didn't drink again- 22years next month. never new why or how until checked out an AA meeting 3 years ago and it all made sense and more importantly even after all those years it became noticeably easier. a lot of what they preach just wasn't for me but there was so much more there that i took back to my every day life. i highly suggest you check it out

with an open mind.

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you have already taken the first step [ asking for help] aa works give it a try you have nothing to loose and plenty to gain. aa has saved my life and every thing dear to me. it's worked for thirty four years and life just gets better. pm me or others, go to meetings, STICK with some winners and get there telephone numbers. i wish you the best YOUR NOT ALONE

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all great advice here - Seadogface & Homerisadope's scenarios pretty much mirror my own experience. Its been a little over 2 1/2 years now without a drink or drug and my life has gotten 150% better. You don't have to do it alone - I'd be more than happy to talk, e-mail or whatever to share my exeperince and talk about the solution, give you any help or just listen - I promise you that putting down the drink will be one of the best things that can ever happen to you.

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