The Fisherman

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About The Fisherman

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    Middletown, CT
  1. Dick -- I've been catching more wild brook trout on the Farmington than usual this year, but none as big as that one. Wait till he colors up in the fall! You're right about August. She's a tricky one. I find March can be deceptive as well...you somehow make it through January and February and you think, "I've got this," so you sit on the fastball and then March throws you a bunch of curves and sliders. I almost packed up and went home after that first bass, I was so happy. TG -- gorgeous sunrise. Haven't been stupid enough to stay out late enough to see one of those... Steve Culton
  2. Points to ponder. Every day is different, every place is different. I also catch bass at night on big flatwings a foot long. :-) Steve Culton
  3. Yesterday was a long day. I was up at 7:20am, took #2 son to soccer camp, then hit the Farmington River for a little nymphing. The water was up a bit, but very fishable, hardly stained, and cold. I only had 90 minutes to fish; spot A was a blank. I know I was getting deep enough because I lost a rig. But I stayed there too long, for spot B had some hungry customers. Best fish of the day was this nice wild brookie. The Farmington doesn't have a lot of wild brook trout, and this was one of the bigger and better ones I've caught over the years. Great contrast on the Fontinalis fins, jaw beginning to kype, and some shoulders on this fellow. Got him on a size 16 wingless March Brown. ~ Picked up #2 son, drove back home, did some work, took #3 son to hockey camp, drove back home, dinner and family stuff... ...and then at 10:40pm I got in the car and drove to Rhode Island. I hadn't caught my August striper yet, and I wanted to get it done, so the pressure was on. Spot A was an estuary, and since I could hear and see bass feeding, I was hopeful. The bad news was that they were not willing to chase a stripped fly -- they were ambushing bait balls from below -- and I couldn't present the way I wanted to at that distance. After 20 minutes I called it. Spot B was a beachfront. Didn't like the easterly breeze, and the surf was a little rough. At least there were no weeds. I gave this 15 minutes before I decided it was too much work. Narragansett Bay is bordered and lined with all kinds of estuaries and coves and skinny water, and that's the kind of place I headed next. I chose a spot where I'd had some luck over the years. When I got there, there was bait -- peanut bunker and silversides -- but no audio or visual cues of feeding fish. Second cast, only about 20 feet, on the dangle below me, BANG! The bass had just been sitting there on the bottom (it was less than 3 feet deep) and he had no problem coming up to the surface to take a peanut bunker snack. As a bonus, it was a good fish, 10-pounds, and once I found an LZ I lipped and released him, saying, "This one's for you, Dick." Hooked two more smaller fish then called it a night -- or make that a long day. I didn't get to bed until after 3am. So, that's a striper on the fly from the shore for eight consecutive months. August can be a sneaky deceptively tough month, so I was happy to get it done on the first night. Hope you're feeling better, doing well, and enjoying these posts. I love catching double digit pound stripers on little flies. This bucktail is 2" long and so sparse you can read the newspaper through it. Steve Culton
  4. Here's a visual response: Last night, dark of the moon, this fly, 2" long, so sparse you can read the newspaper through it, took a 10-pound striper. :-) Steve Culton
  5. Thanks for the update, for being such a good friend, and looking good, Dick! Steve Culton
  6. You can find a diagram of such a rig and an article on how to use it on my website. I love fishing multiple flies in the salt although I’m mostly fishing on or near the surface. You could try a weighted fly on point and a small sand eel dropper above it. Steve Culton
  7. No. What's the bait? Match it for starters. It may be matchstick sand eels or 2" anchovies or 1" clam worms or.... It depends on what the fish are feeding on and how they are feeding. If the bass are crashing sand eels on the surface, or holding on station feeding on tiny grass shrimp, then a weighted fly will not be a good choice. (If you fish for trout, look at it this way: if you arrived at a pool and the trout were sipping sz 24 Trico spinners, would you attack the problem with a tungsten bead head Woolly Bugger?) Depends on the fly. Big flatwings do not present that problem. They fish large and cast small. Much here for you to think about. Hope it helps! Steve Culton
  8. Wow, great slabby slobs! By all means, pile on. We need to keep Dick busy while he's on the mend. :-) Steve Culton
  9. The Salmon River had(has) a sad legacy of snagging, which is now illegal but still happens. Steve Culton
  10. I would drop shot if I could, but on the Salmon River (is it all NY rivers?) you can't place weight below the fly. Check out George Daniel's new book Nymph Fishing. Loaded with great tips. One of the points he makes about using unweighted flies with a drop shot rig is that because the shot is bouncing along the bottom, the flies above are shuddering and fluttering and no weight (and if I may add, the right materials) makes them look more lifelike. Steve Culton
  11. Sorry for the double response, but this is what I wrote at the end of the old thread: The short answer is: No. :-) You play any big striper with the reel and the bottom third of the blank. Between a sharp hook, a stout (20#-30#) leader, and a tight drag, the angler is the one who is dictating terms. You don't need light tackle to overplay a fish. I see it happen all the time with people using what is considered more traditional salt water tackle. Several years ago, I brought a stop watch along with me and timed my battles from hookset to landing with the five-weight, all on bass 28" or better. Someday I'll dig them up and publish them. You can land a big fish a lot faster than you think. Steve Culton
  12. What Mike said. Steve Culton
  13. Hi, The short answer is: No. :-) You play any big striper with the reel and the bottom third of the blank. Between a sharp hook, a stout (20#-30#) leader, and a tight drag, the angler is the one who is dictating terms. You don't need light tackle to overplay a fish. I see it happen all the time with people using what is considered more traditional salt water tackle. Several years ago, I brought a stop watch along with me and timed my battles from hookset to landing with the five-weight, all on bass 28" or better. Someday I'll dig them up and publish them. You can land a big fish a lot faster than you think. Steve Culton
  14. Got a hefty 16" wild brown on the Farmington yesterday. Kype jaw, beautiful trout, but I was underwhelmed by the fight it put up. Smallies will do that to ya. :-) Steve Culton
  15. Ray Charles sang it: Night time is the right time... Mike, I ration my cigar supply. Always try to have a spare in case the bugs get bad or I need to celebrate. Mrs. Culton is an early bird. Many times I'm walking into the house when she's waking up. Steve Culton