Capt.Castafly

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About Capt.Castafly

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  • Interests (Hobbies, favorite activities, etc.):
    stewards of the environment
  • What I do for a living:
    Fishing Captain, Cast a Fly Charters
  1. Fished the Newport Reefs yesterday by boat. Plenty of 22 inch schoolies around. Consistent bite all morning, considering the hot temperatures. Plenty of bird activity to identify the location. The more west you headed the more chance of bluefish.
  2. This fish report blog was created as a communal gather place to share and report weekly fishing activity that could benefit those you use the RI forum. The purpose is to blend together all reports in a portal so they are easy to access into one file.
  3. This fish report blog was created as a communal gather place to share and report weekly fishing activity that could benefit those you use the RI forum. The purpose is to blend together all reports in a portal so they are easy to access into one file. The bright spot - We has participation last week with some timely reports. It's aim is to focus on fishing and to get people fishing. This is to stimulate some actual fish talk here no matter how successful you trip was we want to hear about it to give us some reference what's going on. It might be interesting to have it all here in one thread. Cast away and fire away. We are waiting. Area protocol a must. No giving away specific location, no spot burning as they say.
  4. superglue gel I hope you apply that right away after a few wraps to position the eye. Liquid super glue with penetrate the thread better. That's what I use. Caution: I put a paper towel down to protect my vise base. Using the liquid and wrapping produces some splattering.
  5. This fish report blog was created as a communal gather place to share and report weekly fishing activity that could benefit those you use the RI forum. The purpose is to blend together all reports so they are easy to access into one file. The bright spot - We has participation last week with some timely reports. It's aim is to focus on fishing and to get people fishing. This is to stimulate some actual fish talk here no matter how successful you trip was we want to hear about it to give us some reference what's going on. It might be interesting to have it all here in one thread. Cast away and fire away. We are waiting. Area protocol a must. No giving away specific location, no spot burning as they say.
  6. Capt. Ray Stachelek reports: Friday was such a very special day for Cast a Fly in a lot of different ways. It’s nice to be on the water in such a beautiful place as Block Island, but it ramps it up a bit when I have one on my closest friends, Bob Signorello on board. Bob’s more like a brother. We often joke about that on the phone. He’s from Bethlehem PA. He also brought along one of his fishing buddies, Erik who he has talked about in in length. Life gets in the way sometimes, as the saying goes, but Bob and I finally found a little time together this warm summer day. Like most natural and warm Italians, Bob uses hand gestures to aid with his words while he is trying to get his points across. So it only seemed natural that we’d get our hugs on first greeting. That was wonderful. We met in a super market parking lot way before sunrise. We still had to trailer to the boat ramp and launch. As we hugged, I notice another trailered boats going by. Bob! Every hug cost us ten minutes at the boat ramp as the conga line of trucks grew longer. The seas were flat. The morning ride to the island was quick and fast. We didn’t waste any time at the North Rip. We went directly to my favorite spot. Sunrise is prime time and the window of opportunity is much smaller in the summer, especially in hot weather. The first four hours of sunrise was like magic. We had nice bass dimpling all around the boat. This is the type of angling I like most. Casting to a single target and watching them move to a fly excites me. This is angling form I like the best, matching skill and methodology, getting one single fish to jump on your fly. The next two hour hours we move closer to shore and fished some structure. The bite was much slower, but we did raze some nice fish to keep the momentum going. The last two hours of the trip was quiet. All the sand eels disappeared; all the gulls and shearwater vanished. Now it was finely a chance to sit down and catch up on life’s situation. Thank Bob for an eventful and colorful day. It is always nice to meet a new friend like Erik. Till we fish again.
  7. Our biggest of the day on a fly out at the island. The first four hours of sunrise was like magic. Nice size schoolies rolling on the surface with faint sand eels. When that slowed down fished closer to shore around structure. Still did well, picking up a fish here and there. Last two hours, nothing. bait, birds completely disappeared. You expect that to happen, it's summer with extreme heat.
  8. I haven't seen not one bonito and I been out there many times.
  9. It seems very few are posting fish reports anymore. Doesn't anyone fish anymore? So I created this log for the rest of the summer just to see what our friends are up to on here. It can be any kind of fishing, bottom, sport fishing, crabbing, you name it. If you caught a nice relationship, file it here. This is to stimulate some actual fish talk here no matter how successful you trip was we want to hear about it to give us some reference what's going on. It might be interesting to have it all here in one thread. Cast away and fire away. We are waiting. Area protocol a must. No giving away specific location, no spot burning as they say.
  10. Capt. Ray Stachelek reports: The window of opportunity for off shore marine forecast today looked good. Our aim was to fish Block Island and try for some larger stripers on a fly that have eluded us this season in upper Narragansett Bay. I had been out there last week and did quite well on larger bass. Today was no different. Stripers in the 5-10 lbs. class continue to hold off the island feeding on sparse schools of sand eels. Shearwaters and gulls continue to help us fin...d quality fish. Water was clear hovering around 67 degrees on the surface, wind 5mph from the south, slight chop and small rollers made for a fantastic day. The fog banks kept creeping upon us all morning long. Today was going to be a busman’s holiday. The jovial and infamous Capt. Rene Letourneau broke the ice early in the morning with a nice keeper striper. I followed suit with a larger striper. Than Dave Pollack caught the biggest of the day, estimated at 15 lbs. Rene also double up while Dave was wrestling with his best of the day, made for a great picture. All release healthy and unharmed.
  11. That will never happen. To many paid lobbyist in the commercial sector. They claim lose of wages, economy, etc. The government and other pro striper groups should attack this issue from a health point of view with all the toxins involved. Short of near extinction, that may be the only way to curtail taking of bass.
  12. It hurts to see all those breeders slaughtered at the Block. Like most of us here, I'm concerned about the future of the stock, reproduction, and the current state of conditions of the estuary waters where they winter migrate and re-produce each spring. In most all cases, anglers meet the letter of the law, are doing nothing wrong the way the fishing regulations are now written. But there's another side to this.... the moral issue, how each and everyone of us look at the fishery and make our own judgements. I personal don't see the need to take a fish that big. It's not healthy, not as good tasting, does long term bad effect on the fishery. I don't need to bang my chest at the dock to stratify my bravado. If that's the case with some, they could easily take a picture and have the animal reproduced. Now with the current law of cutting the right pictorial, who now would mount a real fish?
  13. All worms need to eat. They need to travel to find their food source, unlike the mollusk family who filter feed in place . Their diet consists of small micro organic debris and matter. Cinder worms are great swimmers maybe one reason they don't feed along the bottom. There's more nutrients on the surface than any other place this time of year with all the debris blown on it. It's fascinating how much stuff goes on in nature every day, in front of our eyes, that we don't see. It mostly goes unnoticed. Astute fishermen know this who are the sharpies. Every little clue helps putting the complete puzzle together. That's what separates the elite fishermen from the average guy, they know how to discipher gained knowledge and use it in situations.
  14. They can be fishing there legally, but they can not transport these fish to NY waters. If you search on the internet, there's certain zones you can move fish only.
  15. It might be splitting hairs, but what you might be seeing this time of year are worms actually feeding on algae and pollen on the surface. If you see them darting around in straight pluses, turning occasionally, that's the feeding pattern. Most of the time in the reproductive cycle they will swim in circles, pause, secrete their genes. Many don't know but they appear nightly eating almost every night. I notice them around lighted areas. They go unmolested. The taste of striped bass is seasonal. After the spring mating, most stripers will get off them and seek other forage. It's kind of the same season mentality of larger stripers. Try throwing an eel around in the spring. They are on high protein, fatty forage like bunker. In July they will not refuse an eel.